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Old 13 June 2018, 00:01   #1
utri007
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Amiga LAN problem

I have 4 amigas in my LAN

Amiga OS4 machine.
2x Amiga 1200
CDTV

but also 4 windows machines, Buffalo NAS station and HP Laserjet. Buffalo and HP uses static IPs.

Amiga OS4 machine and CDTV uses Roadshow TCP/IP stack and wired LAN.
A1200 machines uses Genesis and WLAN.

All Amigas uses static IP.

All the problems started when I got Huawei 4g router, some years ago. So everything worked with previous router wich was Telewell ADSL modem. When I got it I changed it IP settings to same than previous router had, southat wouldn't need to do changes to clients. IP 192.168.11.1 subnet mask 255.255.255.0. DHCP pool 192.168.11.50-99. So problem is most likely Huawei and lack of mystery feature of Amiga's TCP/IP stacks?

What works :

Can browse internet and access LAN samba shares.

What doesn't work:

Amigas can't see/connect eachother and PCs can't connect/see amigas.
I used to play quake with my son, so that Amiga OS4 machine worked as a server. Can't do that anymore.
Can't ping
Can't use netmount or AmigaExplorer

All these worked before Huawei 4g router.

How ever, if I change Amiga OS4 machine and CDTV use DHCP problems are gone. Windows machines doesn't have these problems with static IPs.

I wan't to use static IPs and I don't want to use Roadshow (or miami) with DHCP on those A1200 machines. Just because 68k version of it doesn't have a GUI and DHCP makes boot so much slower and it is unreliable.

I have newer 4g roter, but it doesn't support WPA anymore, so I'll need to stick with current configuration untill I get clockport SPI and network that way.

Prety sure that nothing can be done, but I'm also curious why I have thse problems?

Last edited by utri007; 13 June 2018 at 07:13.
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Old 13 June 2018, 02:19   #2
hth313
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Your router is probably configured to do DHCP and it has a range of IP numbers that it hands out.

On your local network there are essentially two basic things to configure for a particular machine, the netmask (typically 255.255.255.0 for 8-bit local address) and the IP number. With those set statically, you should be able to ping on your local network, provided the machines are physically connected.

You have two commands that may be helpful, ifconfig/ipconfig to inspect the network interface setup on your local machine. You can also use 'arp -a' to list what the machine has seen on the local network, it shows the mapping of ethernet addresses and IP numbers that it happened to see.

In this case I suggest that you step back to a minimal setup and work from there. Connect one machine and try to ping the router, then you can try two machines and see that they can ping each other, then you can set up default route to ping IP numbers on internet. After that you can try ping to a hostname on internet to see that name server lookup works.

Normally you get these settings from the router, but if you prefer static IPs you may need to configure the router accordingly, which may range from easy or tricky (even impossible) depending on the router.

You can also try to connect to your router from a web browser and inspect its setup. This may also display what it sees on the network, what IP number it has handed out and various other things.
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Old 13 June 2018, 07:20   #3
utri007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hth313 View Post
Your router is probably configured to do DHCP and it has a range of IP numbers that it hands out.

On your local network there are essentially two basic things to configure for a particular machine, the netmask (typically 255.255.255.0 for 8-bit local address) and the IP number. With those set statically, you should be able to ping on your local network, provided the machines are physically connected.

You have two commands that may be helpful, ifconfig/ipconfig to inspect the network interface setup on your local machine. You can also use 'arp -a' to list what the machine has seen on the local network, it shows the mapping of ethernet addresses and IP numbers that it happened to see.

In this case I suggest that you step back to a minimal setup and work from there. Connect one machine and try to ping the router, then you can try two machines and see that they can ping each other, then you can set up default route to ping IP numbers on internet. After that you can try ping to a hostname on internet to see that name server lookup works.

Normally you get these settings from the router, but if you prefer static IPs you may need to configure the router accordingly, which may range from easy or tricky (even impossible) depending on the router.

You can also try to connect to your router from a web browser and inspect its setup. This may also display what it sees on the network, what IP number it has handed out and various other things.
I made some changes to first post, based your question. I can ping router as a internet works every machine and I can connect to NAS, but it is like amigas has some some kind of isolation turned ON.
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Old 13 June 2018, 07:39   #4
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What happens if you ping 216.239.35.4 (time.google.com) from the Amiga?
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Old 13 June 2018, 17:34   #5
utri007
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What happens if you ping 216.239.35.4 (time.google.com) from the Amiga?
All Amigas can connect internet without problems. Amigas are just invisible in LAN. I can't use Amiga Explorer, start Quake between Amigas, mount Amigas hard drives to other Amigas, etc.
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Old 14 June 2018, 02:00   #6
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Sounds like Wireless AP Isolation. You should be able to disable that in your wifi router. If not scrounge another one that doesn't have AP isolation.
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Old 14 June 2018, 11:18   #7
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Sounds like Wireless AP Isolation. You should be able to disable that in your wifi router. If not scrounge another one that doesn't have AP isolation.
Precisely. Also, many access points (and switches can be configured like this too) simply do not allow connectivity to clients that do not use DHCP. I suggest using Roadshow on all the Amiga systems btw, the license is up to 5 devices simultaneously, from what I remember.
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Old 14 June 2018, 11:23   #8
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Maybe try reserving the static IPs of your Amigas within the DHCP pool range of addresses, if your router has that feature. Just in case it's treating some of them differently.
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Old 14 June 2018, 14:22   #9
utri007
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Precisely. Also, many access points (and switches can be configured like this too) simply do not allow connectivity to clients that do not use DHCP. I suggest using Roadshow on all the Amiga systems btw, the license is up to 5 devices simultaneously, from what I remember.
No, it can't be AP isolation or any other limitation of router. There is AP isolation option, but it is turned OFF. And Windows machines, NAS and printer are totally OK with static IP.

I don't want to use Roadshow. I just use it with CDTV as it is most lightway solution. I bought a license just to support purpose.
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Old 14 June 2018, 14:24   #10
utri007
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Maybe try reserving the static IPs of your Amigas within the DHCP pool range of addresses, if your router has that feature. Just in case it's treating some of them differently.
There is no way to reserve IP from DHCP pool, but is is possibility manage connections through mac addressis. But still, problem is just with Amigas.
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Old 14 June 2018, 16:19   #11
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So how about IPv6? Could it be that all your working devices are talking over IPv6

Last edited by kolla; 14 June 2018 at 17:58.
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Old 14 June 2018, 20:31   #12
utri007
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So how about IPv6? Could it be that all your working devices are talking over IPv6
No, my LAN is pure IPv4
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Old 14 June 2018, 21:22   #13
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Really? That's pretty rare these days.
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