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Old 18 March 2011, 15:04   #1
ceedy
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Pocket O'Scope

anyone seen or tried one of these before??

http://www.wide.hk/products.php?prod...l-Oscilloscope

C.
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Old 18 March 2011, 16:27   #2
Loedown
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I haven't personally, but it seems like a fairly interesting bit of kit for first glance, it's too late and I'm too tired to make a better comment.
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Old 18 March 2011, 18:18   #3
Eamoe
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Anyone who read one of my posts is aware I know close to nix in electronics, yet, while I'm at it, I'm asking the question: what are oscilloscopes for?
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Old 18 March 2011, 19:30   #4
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Ceedy,

Looks neat but the 1 MHZ bandwidth is a bit limiting. Looks like 1 channel only which is also limiting. It has many measurements built in and a reasonable sample depth.

I would recommend a 2 channel scope with at least 10 MHz bandwidth as a minimum, then you can compare input/output waveforms and measure video signals.

Maplin sell some 'Personal' oscilloscope for £100 or less. These are single channel but have at least 10 MHz bandwidth.

Eamoe,

Take a look at this oscilloscope primer from Agilent.

http://cp.literature.agilent.com/lit...989-8064EN.pdf

The choice of oscilloscope is a fiddly one. The more you pay, the better equipment you get but how often will you use it to justify the cost?

You can by used scopes cheaply but they are likely to be the CRT type that has none of the LCD readout features.

Ian
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Old 18 March 2011, 19:50   #5
ceedy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stedy View Post
Ceedy,

Looks neat but the 1 MHZ bandwidth is a bit limiting. Looks like 1 channel only which is also limiting. It has many measurements built in and a reasonable sample depth.

I would recommend a 2 channel scope with at least 10 MHz bandwidth as a minimum, then you can compare input/output waveforms and measure video signals.

Maplin sell some 'Personal' oscilloscope for £100 or less. These are single channel but have at least 10 MHz bandwidth.

Eamoe,

Take a look at this oscilloscope primer from Agilent.

http://cp.literature.agilent.com/lit...989-8064EN.pdf

The choice of oscilloscope is a fiddly one. The more you pay, the better equipment you get but how often will you use it to justify the cost?

You can by used scopes cheaply but they are likely to be the CRT type that has none of the LCD readout features.

Ian
====================

Thanks

Wasn't looking to buy one...
Thought this one was probably not quite there .. you do get what you pay for!!
I think these lil un's will allow you to save a previous waveform as a background and allow some sort of limited comparing.

But I haven't had the need of one since I made a weeny one from one of the Berni babani books . and even that one was probably not much better than these . if at all .


yup I'm that old !!

Chris
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Old 18 March 2011, 22:56   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eamoe View Post
Anyone who read one of my posts is aware I know close to nix in electronics, yet, while I'm at it, I'm asking the question: what are oscilloscopes for?
They are for show how current looks (ie to show waveform of electric current described by level ie voltage in time axis)
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Old 19 March 2011, 02:45   #7
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1MHz is absolutely useless (as is 10 IMO).

For anyone wanting a relatively low-cost scope I very highly recommend the Rigol DS1052E. I have one and am very happy with it, it has a colour LCD, 50mhz bandwidth and 2 channels. Agilent actually rebadge this model and resell it as their low-end scope which says a lot.

They can even be upgraded to 100mhz by changing a couple of bytes in the firmware!
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Old 20 March 2011, 04:02   #8
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@ pandy71
@ Stedy



A picture of voltage in time. Could this do the job of both a multimeter and a logic probe, for instance?

What would be the difference in the pictures of a waveform, of which one would be taken before and the other after some component -- say, a resistor for instance?

Sorry for getting off topic...
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Old 20 March 2011, 14:48   #9
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A picture of voltage in time. Could this do the job of both a multimeter and a logic probe, for instance?
Usually multimeter is more accurate (higher resolution and accuracy) but much slower. I theory imagine that o'scope is like quite fast multimeter that drawing on screen voltage value in time (so time always growing in linear way - this is very simple oscope - sometimes time can be non linear but this is only in most expensive oscopes for special purposes) - so X is your time grow, Y is level - measure level with multimeter, place a dot o, X,Y, do next measurement of Y with new X+1, place dot, etc - this is how digital scope works - analog scope are very similar only they measure all values (ie and level) in continuous way. Logic probe show You very simplistic picture - ie 1, 0, X, etc - but also - use a time as Your X axis, values as Y axis, draw this on screen and thats it - "Picture of voltage in time".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eamoe View Post
What would be the difference in the pictures of a waveform, of which one would be taken before and the other after some component -- say, a resistor for instance?

Sorry for getting off topic...
Difference depend from the nature of component - how component change electrical current - change can be linear, non linear, frequency dependant or not etc - so for resistor usually it will be linear and not frequency dependent - expect smaler Y values after resistor than Y value before resistor.

Btw if You have more than 1 channel on scope then You can see Y values before and after component at the same moment on screen.
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Old 20 March 2011, 21:29   #10
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Thanks, very interesting indeed!
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