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Old 01 September 2019, 11:25   #1
deimos
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Baking soda and superglue?

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Has anyone here tried this? A few months ago I watched a youtube video on repairing plastic items with baking soda and superglue, but today I came across this video, which shows the repair of a typically broken commodore monitor control cover, which has convinced me to try it.

But before I do, has anyone here tried it themselves? Were the results as good as expected?
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Old 01 September 2019, 12:15   #2
LaBodilsen
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Hi Deimos
I have tried it, and it works quite well. I did a repair on a small mp3 player, where the play button had come loose from a flex joint. I do however think that he made a mistake in the video, as you should rough up the contact surface first, so that the glue will have better grip.

But, I have since made similar repairs with 5 minute epoxy, which i found much easier to work with. as you can build up the structure while it cures. Also i think the epoxy is more flexible when cured, so it is not as brittle as the superglue+baking soda method.
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Old 04 September 2019, 12:07   #3
solarmon
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I used this suplerglue and baking soda method to repair my Gotek case that had been broken in transit:





I didn't bother filing/sanding it down as it was the on the inside of the case.
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Old 04 September 2019, 12:20   #4
robinsonb5
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I use it occasionally as a bodge on guitar nut slots, until I have to cut a new nut from scratch - and it works very well in that context. As you might expect the material it creates is gritty and brittle but it cures almost instantly. (It can generate heat while curing, though - so be cautious about using it on a larger scale.)

Another option for plastic repairs is Polymorph, also known as shapelock or polycaprolactone. It's only suitable where it won't get hot since its melting point is very low - but it can be melted in hot water then shaped by hand. The craziest thing I've made with polymorph so far is a router base for my Dremel!
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Old 04 September 2019, 12:30   #5
malko
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My mini-godzillas break so much things (by curiosity to know how things are made) that such repairing method may come to be useful soon
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Old 04 September 2019, 13:17   #6
deimos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robinsonb5 View Post
I use it occasionally as a bodge on guitar nut slots, until I have to cut a new nut from scratch - and it works very well in that context. As you might expect the material it creates is gritty and brittle but it cures almost instantly. (It can generate heat while curing, though - so be cautious about using it on a larger scale.)

Another option for plastic repairs is Polymorph, also known as shapelock or polycaprolactone. It's only suitable where it won't get hot since its melting point is very low - but it can be melted in hot water then shaped by hand. The craziest thing I've made with polymorph so far is a router base for my Dremel!
I've just discovered Polydoh Moldable Plastic, which looks the same as Polymorph except maybe it's possible to colour match it - it comes with little packs of colour.
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Old 04 September 2019, 20:31   #7
nogginthenog
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I used Milliput to repair a crack in my plastic bath. It's lasted for years! It's a 2 part putty you mix together and can shape using water. When it's dry you can sand it.

https://www.milliput.com/
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Old 07 September 2019, 22:06   #8
Irl
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I use this trick often. One of the best successes I had was in repairing a plastic side-view mirror mount on a car with it. The glue ends up a lot harder and sets almost instantly when the baking soda is applied to it. 3 years of weather exposure and the car's mirror is still there. A little paint and you hardly can tell it was ever broken.

There are different thicknesses of cyanoacrylate ('superglue'). The gel type is very good for crack-filling.
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