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Old 12 February 2014, 04:30   #27
matthey
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Kansas
Posts: 1,284
Quote:
Originally Posted by fondpondforever View Post
I contacted them about a month ago by email and they didn't answer. Probably to busy. I guess the EAB isn't really for topics like this but I thought I would ask about the employment fields anyway. There must be some Amiga Industry in existence with games like MACE and Frogatto coming out for OS4. I wonder if those games were developed on OS4. To increase the sales of Amiga Future Magazine the writers should add a feature called 'Retrospective' at the back of the Magazine reviewing classic hardware, software and games with about 10 pages maximum covering it. This would be Awesome.
Don't be surprised if businesses don't respond back. E-mails get lost, existing customers take priority and times are tough if inquiring about a job. If you don't already have skills needed by the company, then good luck.

I personally don't see Hyperion and AmigaOS 4.x going anywhere. They are stuck with dying PowerPC and aren't getting updates out very fast. If they don't get SMT working and/or produce AmigaOS 4.x for another CPU, they are dead. MorphOS has a better chance IMO. I wouldn't be surprised to see them jump to x86_64 or ARM. The best chance for Amiga is some adaption of AROS which could be x86_64, ARM, or 68k. Yes, I said 68k. Modern affordable FPGAs can now produce a faster CPU (and hardware) than the original Amiga. The fpgaArcade is capable of 68030-68040 speeds with a primitive CPU design and the hardware blows away real AGA. There is a more advanced 68k fpga design that will be going into Majsta's fpga accelerators. Don't underestimate the quirky old 68k. The 68060 outperforms every superscalar only processor we tested in cache/memory performance (low end ARM and Atom) and outperforms most OoO processors. The strong cache/memory performance that powers the x86/x86_64 past ARM and PowerPC is also possible in the 68k but with better code density and less decoding overhead. Many people love the Amiga classic. Products that give the Amiga feel with more speed, good compatibility and a low price have a better chance to sell to the Amiga market by the tens of thousands and expand the Amiga base enough to matter. The 68k is the base for all the other Amiga systems and the encoding makes for a nice compact cross platform byte (actually 16 bit) code. Programming for 68k 3.x actually gets you the largest Amiga customer base if you don't bang the hardware.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fondpondforever View Post
So if I want to follow my childhood dream I should do the following:

1. Become familiar with Amiga Operating Systems like OS4 and Morph
Learning to program and becoming familiar with the AMIGA programming and development environments is a good start. Just don't quit your day job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fondpondforever View Post
2. Design Computer Games in Amiga Software
Like I said, I would start with AmigaOS 3.x with CGFX support. Vbcc would be a good compiler to play around with. It's easy and fast to install and can produce executables for many Amiga platforms.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fondpondforever View Post
3. Send off my ideas and instalments to companies that would be interested In them
I would skip this part. There really aren't many publishers or companies that would care about the Amiga. Play around, create something to show, look for people to help, put up a web site showing it off, sell it on your web site through one of those PayPal click to purchase shops.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fondpondforever View Post
4. Play, Test and Review Amiga Games
I don't know how important the playing and reviewing is. It may turn into a distraction .

Quote:
Originally Posted by fondpondforever View Post
5. Create more games based on research and inspiration
There you go. I do think really good playable, addictive and creative games would sell. You just have to realize that the Amiga user base is currently small.
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