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Old 14 May 2017, 03:22   #17
Kalamatee
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Join Date: May 2017
Location: Scotland
Posts: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by wXR View Post
Hello everyone,

I wanted to take this opportunity to separate out of the Critical components to open source thread the lively AROS-related discussion that kicked up there, in order that the thread may return to its primary topic.

As one forum member rightly pointed out, while we work to address the injustice that is the closed-source Amiga OS 3.1, there is a very worthy project called AROS that certainly deserves our attention. To my mind, this is especially true considering the Vampire team’s recent moves, which I see as a boon to awareness and development of the project. It is something that I at least would like to seize upon and assist along in any way possible.

Before the topic of bounties is directly addressed however, I want to express a personal opinion about why they have largely failed up to this point. Some would say that it is a matter of lacking interest, and maybe that is so. But on the whole I take a different view: I believe that the user experience around bounties and AROS development is appallingly bad. Just take a look. As it stands, discussion, development, and bounties are spread out across multiple domains, most of which are running early 2000s-era software. This breaks the continuity completely. For example, here is one bounty that is reasonably funded, and arguably pretty important, yet unclaimed for over five years. Perhaps this is a simple lack of interest, but I suspect UX is as much to blame, if not more so. After all, how many times a day are people checking that domain?
While I understand where you are coming from, there are a number of considerations regarding this that have been discussed on the AROS mailing list.

The bounties are not handled/managed by the AROS dev team - they are handled by a 3rd party that is not directly affiliated to AROS (as nothing that isn't under the aros.org umbrella, is). There are a number of reasons for this including making sure there is no conflict of interest between the donors, or developers, or any issues of misappropriating funds etc. Having an external entity handle this also prevents the "core" devs taking all the bounties, and makes it more necessary to prove the bounty is fulfilled before it is considered completed and payment made.

AFAIK - the main reason is the lack of (capable) devs to take on those bounties, or lack of interest/motivation from the devs who are able. A number of them are to all extents and purposes complete, or almost complete - but the people who have done the work have not wanted to take the bounty, or not felt able to finish in the allotted time.

Quote:
By contrast, here is a bounty that is directly connected with an issue that is able to be engaged very much like a forum thread. Being hosted on GitHub also means that it is accessible (though by no means automatically visible) to all of the existing users of that platform. In other words, GitHub has the potential to act as connective tissue between discussion, development, and bounties. There are also bounty platforms which integrate directly with GitHub to make this aspect even more flexible. On the whole, assuming the goal of creating an active, open community around a project – one which feels inclusive and organized (albeit in the sometimes chaotic style of an active open source project) – I believe that this is the correct way to do things.

Now, getting to the meat of it: I am willing to donate an initial $25,000 to AROS68K-related (ABIv0) bounties, if a team is willing to organize in the manner described above, on GitHub. Yes, my offer requires some initially uncomfortable changes, and perhaps a grumbling abandonment of certain intellectual investments, but I make this offer with a sincere belief that it will be better for everyone in the long run. There are no other strings attached. In fact, I turn everything past this point over to the community: I would very much appreciate it if what came out of this thread, was a lively discussion outlining what you guys see as the most important developments for AROS as a core, standalone operating system for 68K systems – past, present, and future. I will contribute to it myself, but where the bounty money goes will have to be directed by collective good sense – and I sincerely hope you have it. This is not the place to request an MP3 player or a browser, for example. At least not yet.
As already mentioned that's unlikely to happen (I'm not saying it wont or is impossible) - but there are concerns from the devs point of view of the implications of handling the bounties, etc, themselves - or the appearance they do if it falls under the remit of the AROS.org domain. It is enough work maintaining the site, working on code and once in the blue moon trying to update docs - indeed some of these things get neglected as is.

Also - regarding GIT. AROS has stuck with SVN for a number of reasons, but mainly because using GIT forces it to stay with GIT. Currently, the devs who do work on AROS do so using the scm of choice, and since those all can handle SVN - it makes more sense to use the common denominator. That's why there are public copies of the AROS repository available via git already (e.g. Jasons mirror on github).


Quote:
Please try to be productive, helpful, and on-topic. Anti-AROS sentiment is not welcome in this thread at all; please start another one if you want to rant in that direction.

Power to the people? Let's see how it goes.
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