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Old 30 June 2016, 22:17   #53
meynaf
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Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Lyon / France
Age: 44
Posts: 2,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorham View Post
You can just handle assembly language like a script language. The question is whether it's useful or not. Probably not
Ok. Let's say you've found the instruction move.l (a0)+,d0. Now how to determine it's valid or not ?
No, really, it's simply not possible.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorham View Post
But where does most of the overhead come from? I don't see how a simple memory protection scheme is going to generate much overhead except for the MMU, but I might be wrong.
How do you handle the memory lists ? Remember, for memory protection you have to know which areas belong to whom. Might be very funny in case of heavy memory fragmentation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorham View Post
Well, I have a peecee...
Oh yeah ? Didn't know


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorham View Post
Unworkable. The whole system slows down when most of the CPU is in use. It's just not practical.
I don't see any slow down when just typing.
Perhaps you're just using the wrong texteditor+soundplayer combination


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorham View Post
That's true, but when you're on a 68030, I don't see the usefulness of sacrificing sound quality, just so that you can almost grind the system to a halt.
Aren't you a little bit exaggerating ?
90% cpu use isn't grinding to a halt.
And for many files quality remains acceptable.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorham View Post
Just count through all 16 bit combinations, endian convert them, look them up in the calibration table as if they're normal samples, and write them out to a new table. I don't see how that's very hard.
Cool, another 128kb table to allocate

This will not bring you far. If you get a 44100hz wav to be played on a machine that's not in productivity mode, you're out. Better endian convert in all cases.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorham View Post
The Sox documentations says that. There are two formats. RIFF and RIFX. They're identical except for the endian and the identifier in the header.
Yea maybe. But 99.99% of existing wav files are little endian.
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