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Old 18 June 2016, 16:35   #28
idrougge
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Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 3,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadOnlyCat View Post
Your high moral standards seem to prevent you from reading the Kickstarter descriptions in full as well (cf above).
No need to read this specific description because the question wasn't specifically directed at this book, as you as an intelligent member of the community can see.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadOnlyCat
The entire point of Kickstarter has nothing to do with avoiding risk, this notion exists purely in your head and ignore basic entrepreneurial reality.
Kickstarter's point is to allow creators to reach their public directly, removing intermediaries does not remove any risks, on the contrary, risks are now borne by the creator when in the past they were taken by the investors/producers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadOnlyCat
In the past, the creator bore the risk, or they found an investor that took on some of the risk for a sizable piece of the profit.
In the Kickstarter system, the investor doesn't take any of the profit, instead the thousands of investors give you a check to be cashed when you deliver your product. Any eventual profits are yours to keep.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadOnlyCat
A fraction of the projects do actually never reach completion. So much for avoiding risk. Also most projects already start with funds of their own, given the very low sums obtained via backers in general, they have to. So if the projects tank, they generally lose a part of their shirt too.
One thing about Kickstarters is that there is no general Kickstarter. You have billion dollar companies kickstarting projects they could fund with the money they invest in coffee each month, you have hopeful christian rock bands who won't ever reach their goals, and you have people who find a niche ready to be exploited due to a combination of small direct investments and an audience consisting of childless IT professionals with cash to spend.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadOnlyCat
Also, you are sorely mistaken if you think the audience of the projects is the sole public for them. Look at the number of backers -> they are ridiculously low compared to what is necessary to make most projects profitable.

Shenmue3, the most successful Kickstarter game campaign.
-> 69,320 backers:
It is a joke, totally unprofitable for a game of this ambition. The game will have to reach one or two orders of magnitude more players than that to be profitable.

-> 6,333,295 $:
A complete joke too, this barely covers the marketing budget for a modern title.
There is no way they can develop the game with this.
If the Shenmue company decided on a goal sum which doesn't cover their expenses, that's something they must handle. That's also a very extreme Kickstarter, far removed from "most projects" and far from the indie spirit once tied to Kickstarter. It's also as far removed from an already proven book project as you can come.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadOnlyCat
And that is the most successful campaign in gaming. Kickstarter is ... a kickstarting mechanism, not a guarantee of profitability. Once a campaign is funded, the work and effort just begins and nothing yet is guaranteed.
YAAB (Yet another Amiga book) is already guaranteed profitability. The costs involved are small until you reach the printing stage, and since you already have the first run booked, you don't need to make a risk-filled estimate of how many copies to print or where to stock them until they're sold. One could just as well print money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadOnlyCat
I wish people started having a better grasp of the reality of making business in this world. Kickstarter is not magic, it does not create valid business models for you, nor does it generate an audience of the desired size. A campaign is just an advance payment.
And that's exactly the point. An advance payment with a minimum of prerequisites is a dream proposition for most businessmen.
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